Letter: In appreciation of the Bristol Police Department

Posted 11/2/23

If you can’t step up and dedicate your life to protect the public, that’s okay, but don’t blame them for doing the job we both expect and need them to do.

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Letter: In appreciation of the Bristol Police Department

Posted

To the editor:

In regards to the recent shooting at the BPD; our local heroes are being criticized on a national level by the suspect’s family. Everyone, in the end, suffers afterwards; the two women, the suspect and the officer, as well as their families. Lives are forever changed.

In a violent encounter, however, the threat needs to be stopped by law enforcement, not a therapist or a social worker. In an emergency situation, the ability to slow down and evaluate motivation most times results in severe injury or loss of innocent life. It's a situation that officers across the country are forced into every day, and one that non-law enforcement individuals are fortunate to not have to experience.

If cars are used as weapons, do we ban cars and institute vehicle regulations similar to gun-control? Of course not. Treat the cause, love your friends and family, and address mental health issues aggressively. As evidenced in recent news, many people suffer from illness; whether it’s a naked man in a car at BPD, an off-duty pilot on mushrooms or a mass shooter. All these people had clear warning signs well ahead of the incident. We all have someone we worry about. We must love and protect them until we can’t, but accept the consequences of their actions without blaming others.

Law Enforcement Officers dedicate their lives to protect ours and they should be highly respected. If you can’t step up and dedicate your life to protect the public, that’s okay, but don’t blame them for doing the job we both expect and need them to do.

What can YOU do? Real human contact outside of social media or text messages. Engage people, love those around you and protect them, sometimes from themselves.

PS: I’m a recent graduate of the Bristol Police Department’s Citizens Academy working towards positive community outreach.

Jason Perusek
Dewolf Avenue

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