Letter: 'Drag Queen' story shows common sense is no longer alive and well

Posted 6/6/19

Drag Queens reading “stories” to children in public libraries — what could possibly be inappropriate about this? I, for one, believe the answer is rather obvious. But judging by the …

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Letter: 'Drag Queen' story shows common sense is no longer alive and well

Posted

Drag Queens reading “stories” to children in public libraries — what could possibly be inappropriate about this? I, for one, believe the answer is rather obvious. But judging by the comments made in various media outlets, apparently including by parents of minor children, vehemently protesting the cancellation, I am increasingly concerned that common sense is no longer alive and well. 

We may all be witnessing (for some time now) the death of legitimate outrage and common sense. 

Initially, I believed that our librarian, Joan Prescott, and the library’s board, had made the right decision to cancel the event. I was even prepared to express my gratitude and admiration to them for their courage in making the call. Given the change in circumstances announced on Tuesday afternoon to reschedule the absurdity, I am understandably reluctant to praise anyone for demonstrating courage under fire. I continue wondering who in their right mind thought having a drag queen in full regalia reading stories to minor children was ever a good idea?

I suspect the initiative was a totally inappropriate attempt by the drag queen and LGBTQIA, etc. communities to promote their different ways of life and indoctrinate the young, impressionable and easily influenced minds of children (and ostensibly some adults) into accepting such ways of life as perfectly normal.

Those protesting the cancellation are always quick to vilify those who support it as radicals who are against inclusiveness and diversity, or worse. Some even impugned the character of Bristol itself and its residents. Nothing could be further from the truth. I do not know of any other country or small hometown more inclusive and diverse in population than the United States and our own patriotic Bristol, Rhode Island.

But, adopting the patently absurd in order to demonstrate one’s inclusiveness, or commitment to promote diversity for diversity sake, are both foolhardy and cowardly. I can’t help but wonder just how tolerant, inclusive and eager to promote diversity of thought and opinion these same protesters would be if believers in the Bible or advocates of conversion therapy were invited to our library to read to children. Does anyone believe this would be tolerated well by the self-proclaimed exclusive advocates of tolerance, inclusion and diversity?  I certainly don’t.

Unfortunately, we are living in perilous times when traditional values and fundamental virtues and morality are challenged at every turn and good people of sound moral character are reluctant to speak up out of fear of being targeted for personal vilification or business boycotts by those who demand tolerance of everyone else but themselves.

Peter Hewett
Bristol

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