Anne Rogers Hawes, Westport

Posted 2/19/20

Anne Rogers Hawes of Westport passed away peacefully on February 13, 2020, surrounded by her “family” of caregivers and her children. She finished her watch at 4 a.m., and set sail …

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Anne Rogers Hawes, Westport

Posted

Anne Rogers Hawes of Westport passed away peacefully on February 13, 2020, surrounded by her “family” of caregivers and her children. She finished her watch at 4 a.m., and set sail downwind to be with her beloved husband, Richard K. Hawes, Jr. (Twonk) who crossed the bar in 2011.

Born May 8, 1921 in Fall River to William Prescott Rogers and Gretchen Harwood Rogers, Anne was the fourth child of five siblings: William P. Rogers, Rosalind Lawrence, Sydney H. Rogers, and Edwin A. Rogers. From an early age, she demonstrated a strong will with an independent streak, setting her own course.

Education in her early years included Westall School in Fall River, Mary C. Wheeler in Providence, RI, and Westover School in Middlebury, Conn. At her father’s urging, in 1939, she also attended Erskine College in Boston for two years. The school motto states: “The Erskine graduate is prepared to meet the uncertainties of the years ahead with courage and confidence.” She lived by those words. America soon went to war.

Thereafter, Anne began her lifelong career of being a caregiver extraordinaire, first at the Truesdale Hospital as a nurse’s aide, and then for her husband and three children. Following her son Dickie’s first birthday, he contracted a serious bacterial infection which left him severely challenged. For the remainder of Anne’s life, she excelled at providing the best care to her son anyone could.

She insisted on putting her needs last, and devoted total love and compassion to him and her family. It became obvious this was her God-given gift. 

Throughout her life, she maintained a self-effacing sense of humor, and gentle kindness. She was full of energy, perpetual motion, and never stopped working without complaint. Anne will be remembered by all ages who knew her as an elegant, selfless, and gracious Lady. She welcomed all ages to come and stay, especially if they needed care and support not available by their own Mums. Known by many as “The Lady”, she instilled wisdom by always giving to others as demonstrated by her daily deeds. She lived life simply. She was frugal and modest, and she didn’t hesitate to voice her opinions. 

In addition, she excelled as the family bookkeeper, cook, gardener, and superb first mate on their 31-foot Concordia Sloop, Salt Wind. She spent 25 years cruising the New England coast with her devoted skipper-husband, and with Dickie as crew.

She passed away, some say, as the “Matriarch” of Westport Harbor, and was the oldest member of the Acoaxet Club. She represented the best of the World War II Generation. She set high standards, championed the underdog, and showed discipline and composure under duress. Along with her friends, Mary MacIntosh and Virginia Lynch, Anne founded the thrift shop at the UCC Church in Little Compton, and started the flower committee. In 1990, she was the President of The Friday Club of Fall River (a writing and reading club) during its 100th anniversary. She was also a member of the Chilton Club and the Colonial Dames of Boston.

Friends, neighbors and family knew her cookie jar was full of her homemade chocolate chip cookies, and the tea kettle was always on.

Anne is survived by her children, Dickie, Bob, and Annie Gray, her daughter-in-law Barbara, her grandchildren Jillian and Heather Hawes, and husband David Dwyer and their children, Isabelle, Beatrice and William.

A Celebration of Life will be held on Friday, May 8, 2020 at 11 a.m. at the Acoaxet Club in Westport. Contributions if desired may be made to the United Congregational Church, Little Compton, RI, or the Westport Land Trust. Arrangements are in the care of the Waring-Sullivan Home at Cherry Place, Fall River. www.waring-sullivan.com

uary 13, 2020, surrounded by her “family” of caregivers and her children. She finished her watch at 4 a.m., and set sail downwind to be with her beloved husband, Richard K. Hawes, Jr. (Twonk) who crossed the bar in 2011.

Born May 8, 1921 in Fall River to William Prescott Rogers and Gretchen Harwood Rogers, Anne was the fourth child of five siblings: William P. Rogers, Rosalind Lawrence, Sydney H. Rogers, and Edwin A. Rogers. From an early age, she demonstrated a strong will with an independent streak, setting her own course.

Education in her early years included Westall School in Fall River, Mary C. Wheeler in Providence, RI, and Westover School in Middlebury, Conn. At her father’s urging, in 1939, she also attended Erskine College in Boston for two years. The school motto states: “The Erskine graduate is prepared to meet the uncertainties of the years ahead with courage and confidence.” She lived by those words. America soon went to war.

Thereafter, Anne began her lifelong career of being a caregiver extraordinaire, first at the Truesdale Hospital as a nurse’s aide, and then for her husband and three children. Following her son Dickie’s first birthday, he contracted a serious virus which left him severely challenged. For the remainder of Anne’s life, she excelled at providing the best care to her son anyone could.

She insisted on putting her needs last, and devoted total love and compassion to him and her family. It became obvious this was her God-given gift. 

Throughout her life, she maintained a self-effacing sense of humor, and gentle kindness. She was full of energy, perpetual motion, and never stopped working without complaint. Anne will be remembered by all ages who knew her as an elegant, selfless, and gracious Lady. She welcomed all ages to come and stay, especially if they needed care and support not available by their own Mums. Known by many as “The Lady”, she instilled wisdom by always giving to others as demonstrated by her daily deeds. She lived life simply. She was frugal and modest, and she didn’t hesitate to voice her opinions. 

In addition, she excelled as the family bookkeeper, cook, gardener, and superb first mate on their 31-foot Concordia Sloop, Salt Wind. She spent 25 years cruising the New England coast with her devoted skipper-husband, and with Dickie as crew.

She passed away, some say, as the “Matriarch” of Westport Harbor, and was the oldest member of the Acoaxet Club. She represented the best of the World War II Generation. She set high standards, championed the underdog, and showed discipline and composure under duress. Along with her friends, Mary MacIntosh and Virginia Lynch, Anne founded the thrift shop at the UCC Church in Little Compton, and started the flower committee. In 1990, she was the President of The Friday Club of Fall River (a writing and reading club) during its 100th anniversary. She was also a member of the Chilton Club and the Colonial Dames of Boston.

Friends, neighbors and family knew her cookie jar was full of her homemade chocolate chip cookies, and the teakettle was always on.

Anne is survived by her children, Dickie, Bob, and Annie, her daughter-in-law Barbara, her grandchildren Jillian and Heather Hawes, and husband David Dwyer and their children, Isabelle, Beatrice and William.

A Celebration of Life will be held on Friday, May 8, 2020 at 11 a.m. at the Acoaxet Club in Westport. Contributions if desired may be made to the United Congregational Church, Little Compton, RI, or the Westport Land Trust. Arrangements are in the care of the Waring-Sullivan Home at Cherry Place, Fall River. www.waring-sullivan.com

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