Poli-ticks

Money influences decisions that aren't in the public interest

By Arlene Violet
Posted 9/18/19

I appreciate my column readers like David Ellis of Portsmouth who provide me documentation and insight into important public issues which are given short shrift by politicians and agencies that are …

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Poli-ticks

Money influences decisions that aren't in the public interest

Posted

I appreciate my column readers like David Ellis of Portsmouth who provide me documentation and insight into important public issues which are given short shrift by politicians and agencies that are supposed to protect us. Where there are mega bucks to be made, companies compromise the integrity of “investigations” by governmental agencies and even universities by sprinkling cash around in efforts to offset unfavorable health-related reports. One current example is the rush to roll out 5G which provides ultra-fast WiFi speeds. Such haste may make waste for generational health in years to come since health concerns have not been adequately addressed.

At least 1000 credible and independent scientists have provided studies at a high level of scientific certainty which call into question the safety of electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure. These studies purport to show attacks on the nervous system and brain, endocrine (hormonal) system, oxidative stress and free radical damage that have central roles in essentially all chronic diseases, DNA mutation, and infertility. These scientists expressed concern about the cumulative effect of exposure and the irreversibility of conditions.

Now the 5G WiFi companies have resorted to the ad hominem attacks previously utilized when the issue of concern about the exposure of children's developing brains to cell phones was raised. Folks who gave warnings then and now with 5G are treated as though they engage in hyperbole. They are personally attacked for being worry warts and alarmists.

Yet, our everyday experience teaches us that some people are more attuned to stressors in human experience. I remember being on a cruise and in the wheelhouse with the ship’s captain. He pointed out to me all the electronics at his disposal but also reminded me of the sailors of yore who negotiated safely through the waters by paying attention to birds and their flights, seaweed, swells, the moon and the stars, the flow of water swirls, sounds, currents, and waves. Their cumulative knowledge of all the individual elements, and putting them all together in decision-making, allowed them to sail safely without instruments.

So, too, today there are scientists who parse all the “signs” to come up with a sure guide. 5G may or may not be as “safe” as it is made out to be. The body of studies should be examined which warn of serious health issues. These scientists may or may not be correct, but given the ramifications of getting 5G wrong as to the dire health consequences which they project, the rush to market should slow down. A bad decision should not be countenanced in the name of making money.
As Mr. Ellis pointed out to me when a pushy salesperson warns the consumer to make a purchase “right now” most knowledgeable folks will walk away rather than consummate the deal. If a product is truly a good idea it will still be a good idea after the plus and minuses are carefully considered. In the rush to enter the internet craze, the public has already gone too far without measuring and weighing the consequences. Adults are acting like teenagers in this regard. It’s far past time to insist that our Congressional delegation look at 5G and health consequences before rushing it to market.

Arlene Violet is an attorney and former Rhode Island Attorney General.

Arlene Violet

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