Letter: Writer wrong — Little Compton is not a racist place

Posted 8/6/20

To the editor:

Let's not fall for Rita Kenahan's inane accusation. Little Compton is not a racist place.

Her letter is just a small example of an ongoing movement in this nation in which the …

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Letter: Writer wrong — Little Compton is not a racist place

Posted

To the editor:

Let's not fall for Rita Kenahan's inane accusation. Little Compton is not a racist place.

Her letter is just a small example of an ongoing movement in this nation in which the goal is to rewrite the complex but wonderful American story (the 1619 Project comes to mind).

Sure, in a nation of over 300 million you will find a few awful examples of racism and sure we had a racist past but, at this point in time, a systemic racist nation we are not. I just hope that the curriculum she expounds does not instill a sense of guilt in our guiltless children. That would be unforgivable.

So here is my recommendation to the Little Compton School Committee. Declare teachers "essential" and open the school this September as recommended by the CDC, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the New England Journal of Medicine.

Bob Venusti

Little Compton

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Jim McGaw

A lifelong Portsmouth resident, Jim graduated from Portsmouth High School in 1982 and earned a journalism degree from the University of Rhode Island in 1986. He's worked two different stints at East Bay Newspapers, for a total of 18 years with the company so far. When not running all over town bringing you the news from Portsmouth, Jim listens to lots and lots and lots of music, watches obscure silent films from the '20s and usually has three books going at once. He also loves to cook crazy New Orleans dishes for his wife of 25 years, Michelle, and their two sons, Jake and Max.