Letter: Why are there 'No Parking' signs in the first place?

Posted 7/2/20

To the editor:

I’ve lived in Barrington for 19 years and I’ve never understood why all the streets in neighborhoods closest to beach access have No Parking signs on every utility pole. …

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Letter: Why are there 'No Parking' signs in the first place?

Posted

To the editor:

I’ve lived in Barrington for 19 years and I’ve never understood why all the streets in neighborhoods closest to beach access have No Parking signs on every utility pole. Wait, that’s not true, I do understand—at least I do now, since reading the June 24 editorial, “No parking means no parking.” Your piece implies that only certain people have a right to use the public beach. In this case, those who can walk or ride to it. This troubles me.

I want to be clear—I don’t even know who wrote this piece—I have no idea if she/he/they live in a neighborhood close to beach access—but I don’t think the opinion expressed speaks for the majority of those who do.

I live about a mile from the beach and can walk or ride my bike. However, occasionally if I’m driving by and want to take a quick walk, I park on Appian Way. I’ve never once encountered a disgruntled resident or anyone who has questioned my parking there. In fact, we often chat and I pet lots of neighborhood dogs. One day a few years ago, after I got out of my car, I asked a resident if it was okay if I parked and took a walk on the beach, and he said, “Yes, of course. It’s everyone’s beach.” How kind. Yes, it’s everyone’s beach.

What I find particularly disingenuous is this comment: “Limiting traffic to those who can walk or ride their bikes to the beach is a great way to ensure that the area is not overwhelmed.” Again, I think you mean not overwhelmed by those “you” don’t want on “your” beach.

Yes, no parking means no parking. But, I ask, why are there No Parking signs in the first place?

Tina Egnoski

Barrington

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