Letter: The good old days weren't always good

Posted 6/1/23

To the editor: The public is being told how today's kids are dealing with mental health issues due to the pandemic. Here is some perspective: If you were born in 1900 most Americans lived in rural …

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Letter: The good old days weren't always good

Posted

To the editor:

The public is being told how today's kids are dealing with mental health issues due to the pandemic. Here is some perspective:

If you were born in 1900 most Americans lived in rural areas. There was no electricity in most places. President Roosevelt did not create the Rural Electrification Administration until 1935. Know what an outhouse is? Some boys fought in World War II, trying not to be killed or gassed — "When Johnny Comes Marching Home ..." Many did not go to school beyond eighth grade because they had to work on a farm or in a factory.

If you were born in 1920, cars were for rich people. Roads were mostly dirt. By the time you were a teen the Great Depression had arrived. You were lucky if your father had a job — "Brother, can you spare a dime?"

If you were born in 1930 there were no cell phones. World War II during your teen years. Steel, sugar, leather, rubber shortages. Blackout curtains on the windows at night. Maybe you, your dad, or uncles didn't come home from the war. Mom worked in a factory making weapons — "Rosie the Riveter."

If you were born in 1940 you may have fought in Korea — "MASH."

If you were born in 1950, you may have fought in Vietnam.

Should I also mention The Gulf War? Afghanistan?

Every generation has had to deal with pimples, puberty, 'Am I good enough to make the team? Am I going to be bullied? Who do I want to be?'

If today's kids realized what previous generations have gone through, maybe they wouldn't have so many mental health issues.

John Lint
Little Compton

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