Letter: Despite what you say, Bristol trash plan doesn’t seem fair

Posted 10/17/19

The editorial and article on the new trash plan in Bristol brought up many questions and offered no answers. It was stated that if some of America’s large cities and East Providence can …

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Letter: Despite what you say, Bristol trash plan doesn’t seem fair

Posted

The editorial and article on the new trash plan in Bristol brought up many questions and offered no answers. It was stated that if some of America’s large cities and East Providence can figure it out, so can Bristol.

Bristol is not a large city and it is not East Providence. Lumping a good and fair solution for businesses with a similar plan for residents misses some significant differences in the needs of many apartment dwellers and individual households.

Where DO residents store these big blue, 96-gallon bins? In many neighborhoods, especially on many the small downtown streets, many houses do not have garages OR driveways, and trash bins are stored outside. These big bins will be an eyesore, out front, on the side or in a backyard.

How can senior citizens be expected to haul these bins around? Really. Many neighborhoods have steep driveways. Is the town responsible for any injuries caused to residents by the necessity of dragging these “behemoths” to the street? The winter snows create a whole other set of problems. I see no evidence of a town concerned for its many seniors or handicapped individuals.

The explanation that savings will come from labor costs because only a driver and automated truck will be needed is contradicted by the fact that the displaced staff will be reassigned to the sewer department and still be a labor cost. I am glad, however, that these hard workers will not lose a job with the town. Apparently the only savings will be in fewer worker’s compensation costs. Is this the only reason we are doing this?

Maybe certain neighborhoods should continue to have the trash picked up the old-fashioned way. Also, why not consider changing the color of the bins? Are there smaller bins that small trash-producing homes could have? I hope this is not a done deal.

The editorial tells us residents should not protest to loudly and that the Town of Bristol is treating everyone fairly. I beg to differ.

Judy Anderson
Bristol

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A lifelong Portsmouth resident, Jim graduated from Portsmouth High School in 1982 and earned a journalism degree from the University of Rhode Island in 1986. He's worked two different stints at East Bay Newspapers, for a total of 18 years with the company so far. When not running all over town bringing you the news from Portsmouth, Jim listens to lots and lots and lots of music, watches obscure silent films from the '20s and usually has three books going at once. He also loves to cook crazy New Orleans dishes for his wife of 25 years, Michelle, and their two sons, Jake and Max.