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Letter: Clearcutting of trees doesn’t benefit Portsmouth

Posted 11/17/20

Editor’s note: This letter was addressed to Kevin M. Aguiar, president of the Portsmouth Town Council.

To the editor:

Mr. President:

We would like to start off with how deeply …

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Please support local news coverage –

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Letter: Clearcutting of trees doesn’t benefit Portsmouth

Posted

Editor’s note: This letter was addressed to Kevin M. Aguiar, president of the Portsmouth Town Council.

To the editor:

Mr. President:

We would like to start off with how deeply disturbed we are that decisions of great magnitude were carried out by elected officials without the voice of those who elected them. 

We have been working our way up the financial ladder through hard work and dedication and when the opportunity to buy a home, a forever home, we jumped at the chance. We have lived in Portsmouth for nine years and have not regretted one moment of our relocation, until recently. 

For the first time we both have serious doubts in the direction the town may go. Every town goes through changes. Shifts in economical, technological and environmental stances and actions. Often these changes are slow and the people are given a voice on how to steer what is best for the town. 

Through research of our experts, we cannot find how clearcutting a green space, the eviction of droves of wildlife and permanently reshaping the land for commercial usage benefits the Town of Portsmouth. All for the goal of a solar farm that would cost the town money in lost tax revenue, the draw of new residents and trust in its government body. The feeling that the Town of Portsmouth is opening the gateway for further concrete jungle atmosphere of Aquidneck Island is rising throughout our community 

Having not been invited to have our say in the ordinance regulations, it’s easy to see how very little consideration has been given to those who will look out their back window every day, every morning and throughout the night to a solar array. Reviewing boundary ordinances of other towns, Portsmouth heavily leans towards the side of industrial and commercial industry. 

Having 40 solar panels on our own roof, I find it hard to understand why we cannot have panels on the town buildings, properties, gymnasiums, etc, etc. We also worry this project is massively shortsighted. Solar energy needs to allow for its benefit to the planet to not coincide with clearcutting acres of trees. No one is happy with the amount of solar that has quickly been built up throughout Portsmouth. Are there any benefits for the residences of our community?

Thank you for your consideration.

Jesse and Azur McHugh

48 Sweet Farm Road

Portsmouth

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Jim McGaw

A lifelong Portsmouth resident, Jim graduated from Portsmouth High School in 1982 and earned a journalism degree from the University of Rhode Island in 1986. He's worked two different stints at East Bay Newspapers, for a total of 18 years with the company so far. When not running all over town bringing you the news from Portsmouth, Jim listens to lots and lots and lots of music, watches obscure silent films from the '20s and usually has three books going at once. He also loves to cook crazy New Orleans dishes for his wife of 25 years, Michelle, and their two sons, Jake and Max.