Editorial: A good response to a bad storm

Posted 8/14/20

We have been quick to criticize National Grid's response to power outages during prior storms. So it is only fair that we praise the company's effort last week.

The tropical storm — it had …

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Editorial: A good response to a bad storm

Posted

We have been quick to criticize National Grid's response to power outages during prior storms. So it is only fair that we praise the company's effort last week.

The tropical storm — it had been named Isaias for a period of time — blew across Barrington last Tuesday afternoon. And while it did not stay long, the storm wreaked plenty of havoc while it was here. The first downed tree limbs were reported before 4 p.m., and by 5, large neighborhoods in Barrington were without power. Branches heavy with leaves strained in the gusty winds, some snapping and falling onto power lines and parked cars.

But the Grid was ready.

Tree crews and power company workers from as far away as Georgia, Tennessee and Indiana had been brought to the region by National Grid in preparation for the storm. And even while the wind was still howling, crews were already responding to outages. On streets all across town, workers hustled to remove downed limbs from roadways and off of wires. And once the branches were cleared, power company workers focused on restoring electricity.

Meanwhile, the Barrington Department of Public Works and local police and fire all joined in the storm response effort, clearing blocked roads and freeing tangled wires.

The coordinated effort was impressive, and by mid-day on Wednesday, the vast majority of Barrington residents had their power back. Refrigerators sprang to life and the hum of air conditioning units replaced the hum of residents' generators.

Mother Nature has shown time and again that 40-, 50- and 60-year-old utility poles and electrical wires do not stand a chance against her. But a well-conceived plan, such as the one built by National Grid prior to last week's storm, is a great way to minimize the impact.

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Mike Rego

Mike Rego has worked at East Bay Newspapers since 2001, helping the company launch The Westport Shorelines. He soon after became a Sports Editor, spending the next 10-plus years in that role before taking over as editor of The East Providence Post in February of 2012. To contact Mike about The Post or to submit information, suggest story ideas or photo opportunities, etc. in East Providence, email mrego@eastbaymediagroup.com.