East Providence lands squarely in middle of RIDE assessment pack

School district, vast majority of its buildings, earn three out of five “stars”

By Mike Rego
Posted 11/14/19

EAST PROVIDENCE — East Providence Schools landed squarely in the middle of the pack with a host of other districts in the second overall performance “Report Card” issued by the …

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East Providence lands squarely in middle of RIDE assessment pack

School district, vast majority of its buildings, earn three out of five “stars”

Posted

EAST PROVIDENCE — East Providence Schools landed squarely in the middle of the pack with a host of other districts in the second overall performance “Report Card” issued by the Rhode Island Department of Education (RIDE) last week.
East Providence received a cumulative rating of three out of five “stars,” according to the ratings based on eight information points: Accountability, Assessments, Civil Rights Data, Educator Data, Finance, Graduation Rates, NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress) and Postsecondary Participation.
Looking at the numbers, it’s obvious why East Providence earned three stars as a whole. Ten of the district’s 11 individual schools measured were awarded that many. Only Martin Middle School, with “two stars,” failed to reach the city average. The former Oldham Elementary, prior to its reconfiguration into an early learning center this fall, was included in the survey.
Putting that figure into context, only 22 schools of the 313 in Rhode Island earned “five stars,” including a mere two high schools: Barrington and Classical (Providence). Similarly, there were just four middle schools — Barrington, Wickford, Jamestown and North Cumberland — that received the top rating. Forty-nine schools earned “four stars” and 35 were given the lowest rating, “one star.”
Like the district overall, in the key measures the majority of East Providence’s 5,200 students, roughly 75 percent, were either “partially meeting expectations/had basic understanding” or “were meeting expectations” of subjects in which they were tested last year.
The report included information about East Providence’s participation in the 2018 assessments administered by the state in English Language Arts (ELA), mathematics and science of the Rhode Island Comprehensive Assessment System (RICAS) in grades 3-8, Rhode Island Next Generation Science Assessment (NGSA) in grades 5, 8 and 11, Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) in grade 11, and the Dynamic Learning Maps (DLM) alternate assessment in grades 3-8 and 11.
In terms of finances, again, the district was right about at the figure for the rest of Rhode Island during the period reviewed. State average spent per pupil was $17,327. In East Providence, it was $17,077.
One very positive measure for the district, specifically at East Providence High School, was the continued improvement in graduation rates. EPHS students graduated at 86 percent in 2018, up five points from two years prior.

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Mike Rego

Mike Rego has worked at East Bay Newspapers since 2001, helping the company launch The Westport Shorelines. He soon after became a Sports Editor, spending the next 10-plus years in that role before taking over as editor of The East Providence Post in February of 2012. To contact Mike about The Post or to submit information, suggest story ideas or photo opportunities, etc. in East Providence, email mrego@eastbaymediagroup.com.