Letter: Nanaquaket Bridge ‘a disgusting mess’

Posted 7/27/18

I have recently become a member of the Tiverton community, having moved here from Providence seven months ago. I chose to build a home in Tiverton because I was tired of the crime, litter, graffiti …

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Letter: Nanaquaket Bridge ‘a disgusting mess’

Posted

I have recently become a member of the Tiverton community, having moved here from Providence seven months ago. I chose to build a home in Tiverton because I was tired of the crime, litter, graffiti and noise associated with urban living. I’m an avid walker and biker and have loved exploring the roads, hiking trails and beaches of my new town.

Particularly charming is the little bridge that crosses the pond over to Nanaquaket Road which, most days, is crowded with people of all ages trying their luck at fishing.  

The problem is this. I can’t enjoy my morning walk across the Nanaquaket bridge. The place is a disgusting mess. Evidently our visiting fishing enthusiasts aren’t so enthusiastic about picking up after themselves. The bridge is littered with dead, rotting fish, smashed mussel shells, old cardboard bait boxes, napkins, chicken bones, coffee cups, and other unsavory, smelly items.

There is one trash can on the bridge and it is well used, often to the point of overflowing. Atop the bridge is a large sign threatening a $500 fine for littering. That’s good. But, where’s the enforcement? A regular passing police car might help. An occasional plain clothes officer on the bridge handing out $500 citations for littering would be even better.

This ought to be a fairly simple problem to solve. Tiverton is a true hidden gem. Can’t we keep it that way?

Heidi Janes

Tiverton

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