Letter: Hunting teaches youth to understand, appreciate wildlife

Posted 3/18/20

To the editor:

I am writing in response to Dennis Tabella's letter, "Why does state encourage children to kill animals?"

Let me begin with:  What is wrong with you?  

As the …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Not a subscriber?


Start a Subscription

Sign up to start a subscription today! Click here to see your options.

Purchase a day pass

Purchase 24 hours of website access for $2. Click here to continue

Day pass subscribers

Are you a day pass subscriber who needs to log in? Click here to continue.


Letter: Hunting teaches youth to understand, appreciate wildlife

Posted

To the editor:

I am writing in response to Dennis Tabella's letter, "Why does state encourage children to kill animals?"

Let me begin with:  What is wrong with you?  

As the director of Defender of Animals, you clearly have no education in the realm of hunting or, for that matter, the process requisite in acquiring a license.  Nor do you have an understanding of the fact that hunting manages wildlife populations, without which, starvation would be a cruel result from an insufficient food source ratio to an overly populous fauna ratio.  In addition, hunting provides funding for conservation and wildlife management, and, hunters are governed by specific laws and regulations.

It would be helpful if, before you go on a rant, that you perform a bit of research on the target you are about to attack.

You go on and on about 12-year-old children participating in killing, and that "a state agency sends the message to children … fun to kill and maim other living beings.  What you lack, Mr. Tabella, is the knowledge that no state will issue a hunting license without requiring the completion of a hunter safety course, all the while imparting the moral, ethical, and humane obligations that are imposed upon each and every hunter.  

Having grown up around guns and hunters I was taught at a very young age (8 years, and reminded regularly throughout my childhood) about the dangers of handling a firearm if you do not respect what it is and what it can do.   Though I did not hunt, I was taught to fire a weapon (and proved quite accurate), but never was I allowed to go anywhere near a gun without adult supervision.  

Furthermore, I was taught, just as RI DEM and The Light Foundation teach (I know, because I actually called The Light Foundation and the RI DEM) that if you wound an animal you are obligated to humanely euthanize it and save it from suffering - in some instances this would involve tracking the wounded animal.  I am sure you did not know that The Light Foundation will begin the wild turkey hunt with a safety meeting and then a safety course, and that the young would-be hunters are guided by experienced hunters.  

There is absolutely no reason not to encourage a young person, who shows interest, to hunt.  What perfect opportunity to help them gain an understanding and appreciation for wildlife.  Depending upon the maturity level of the youth, 12 years of age is an appropriate age for the instruction and understanding of the responsibilities and accountability requisite in participating in the sport.  As far as compassion towards animals, I believe that the majority of people are compassionate, and those who are not are usually publicly humiliated when it comes to light.

I agree with you on one point, and that is that kids today have far too much violence at their fingertips when it comes to entertainment - movies, video games; hell, society overall.  But, after having read your letter, I was left with the impression that perhaps it is you who has seen too many violent movies.

Louise Dina

Tiverton

2020 by East Bay Newspapers

Barrington · Bristol · East Providence · Little Compton · Portsmouth · Tiverton · Warren · Westport
Meet our staff
Jim McGaw

A lifelong Portsmouth resident, Jim graduated from Portsmouth High School in 1982 and earned a journalism degree from the University of Rhode Island in 1986. He's worked two different stints at East Bay Newspapers, for a total of 18 years with the company so far. When not running all over town bringing you the news from Portsmouth, Jim listens to lots and lots and lots of music, watches obscure silent films from the '20s and usually has three books going at once. He also loves to cook crazy New Orleans dishes for his wife of 25 years, Michelle, and their two sons, Jake and Max.