Letter: Please choose the smaller trash carts for Bristol

Posted 11/13/19

Note: This letter was submitted to the Bristol Town Council, Bristol Town Administrator and Director of Public Works.

I respectfully offer the following information in hopes to persuade you to …

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Letter: Please choose the smaller trash carts for Bristol

Posted

Note: This letter was submitted to the Bristol Town Council, Bristol Town Administrator and Director of Public Works.

I respectfully offer the following information in hopes to persuade you to make some changes to the new trash plan.

I have done some phone and web research and found that most communities in Rhode Island who have switched to the automated trash pickup plan distribute the 65-gallon cart (not the 95-gallon) to residents with an option to choose a smaller 35-gallon bin. Newport, Providence, Middletown, Smithfield, Warwick, Cumberland and Cranston all distribute the 65-gallon bins as the standard size.

I spoke with someone at the DPW in Newport who told me that when they rolled out their new automated trash plan, the standard cart size offered was 65 gallons, with the 35-gallon alternate available upon request. It was explained to me that they offered the smaller size for use by the elderly and because Newport has space constraints in many neighborhoods (like Bristol).

Cranston is currently in the process of switching over to automated trash pickup. Unlike Bristol, Cranston has opted for a contract with an outside vendor, however the mechanics of the plan seem like something Bristol should consider. Some highlights: Two 65-gallon (not 95-gallon) carts will be distributed, one for trash and one for recycling, and they will provide smaller, 35-gallon carts if requested. There will be mailings to inform residents about the new plan.

Carts will be displayed visually in City Hall so residents can review available options. Below is a link to the Nov. 8 article in the Cranston Herald in which the Cranston rollout is explained.

http://cranstononline.com/stories/new-trash-carts-on-the-way,89587 

Previously I emailed links to some videos to members of the town council showing (1) the 95-gallon cart in use, and (2) the switching from the 95 to the 65-gallon carts and the reasoning for the switch. The links to these videos are below, and I have also added a third link to a video which shows the advantages of the 35-gallon carts in some situations.

Also, there may be unintended consequences. Those great big carts could actually invite more trash, like attic and basement cleanouts, when the goal is to encourage more recycling and less trash to save on disposal costs. Leave the cleanouts to the private companies; they do a great job.

I hope this information will persuade you to rethink the size of the carts you plan to distribute and that you will offer a choice up front for residents. It is obvious the 95-gallon will not work for me and many others. We don’t have to try out the big carts to know the obvious; for some residents the 35-gallon would be perfect.

Judy Anderson
Bristol

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