Letter: It’s ok to have conflicting feelings about ‘Drag Queen’

Posted 7/4/19

Regarding the Drag Queen Storytime at the Rogers Free Library on Saturday, June 15, I, for one, was not standing on either side of the library steps in protest, or in support. I for one, stand …

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Letter: It’s ok to have conflicting feelings about ‘Drag Queen’

Posted

Regarding the Drag Queen Storytime at the Rogers Free Library on Saturday, June 15, I, for one, was not standing on either side of the library steps in protest, or in support. I for one, stand in the “not sure” category.

I am eagerly willing to engage in conversation over the event. I agree with supporters in that if a parent wants to ensure that their children will not be involved in the event, they can simply just not be in the library at that time.

What I do take issue with is the pervasive feeling that if a person has doubts, and dares to voice those doubts, that that person is perceived of as not being forward thinking, not progressive, narrow minded. Not all those expressing concerns are right wing conservative religious enthusiasts. 

It also took a “run-by” past my very open minded and LGBTQ-allied 32-year-old daughter to help me see what was truly bothering me about this event. Is hyper-sexualizing attire: heavy makeup, a tight gown, pushed up breasts, and 6-inch stiletto heels, appropriate for anyone, of any gender or orientation, to wear while reading to young children?

I thought we were fighting hard to stop objectifying people, particularly women?

Moreover, my daughter asks the question: the LGBTQ movement has worked hard to disassociate itself from just being considered sexual deviance or kink; does dressing in such overtly sexualized attire while introducing young minds to these concepts help the cause?

Perhaps it would have been better for Ramona to show up without his drag persona, so as not to conflate performance with identity, or transgenderism with sexuality, for children and people who have a hard time grasping these nuanced concepts.

All can be thankful that it wasn’t up to me to allow, or to cancel the event, as I would have a difficult time of it. My purpose in writing this letter is not to condemn or approve, but, to simply ask for tolerance, on both sides, as it is indeed the word of the day.

Jean Sharac
Bristol

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