Tourister developers submit lone proposal for Warren site

Brady Sullivan hopes to work with town on redevelopment of former National Grid site

By Ted Hayes
Posted 12/5/19

Warren planners are moving ahead review and approval processes after only one entity submitted a plan to work with the town on the redevelopment of the former National Grid site in north …

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Tourister developers submit lone proposal for Warren site

Brady Sullivan hopes to work with town on redevelopment of former National Grid site

Posted

Warren planners are moving ahead review and approval processes after only one entity submitted a plan to work with the town on the redevelopment of the former National Grid site in north Warren.

The Warren Town Council had been scheduled to review proposals in January, but will instead discuss the lone proposal next Tuesday, Dec. 10. Brady Sullivan Properties, the developer of the American Tourister mill apartment and retail complex, was the only entity to submit a proposal by Warren’s Wednesday, Dec. 4 deadline.

Warren officials agreed to purchase the 1.38-acre site for $450,000 earlier this year, saying that officials’ ultimate goal is to find a commercial partner to help renovate, expand and manage the property into the future while creating a "gateway" to the town replete with public amenities.

Brady Sullivan’s proposal includes:

* Restoring the small brick utility building adjacent to Route 114, building a small addition and creating finished space for a future commercial tenant.

* Building a new building on an existing foundation on the site. This building would also house finished space for a future commercial tenant.

* Developing a parking plan that connects the existing mill parking lot to the town-owned site, creating “an efficient site circulation pattern and connection to Main Street … in order to create a site that feels and functions as one.”

* Expanding the walking path along the water north, and developing common space for the public to use “as a destination and connector to the water and adjacent neighborhood on Water Street.”

Discussion of lease terms would be in the hands of the council, Warren Town Planner Bob Rulli said Thursday.

What will eventually be housed in the existing and new buildings is unknown. However, Mr. Rulli said there has been interest in the site from brewery/restaurants and at least one upscale bakery that operates elsewhere in Rhode Island. He said that while the whole proposal needs to be explored, the opportunity to work with Brady Sullivan is interesting, given parking realities in the area and the ability to streamline the property’s development with the surrounding mill property.

Under the proposal, Brady Sullivan officials presented a fast timeline of when the firm would start its work following the plan’s ultimate approval. That timeline includes:

Being awarded the project in January 2020; finalizing a lease agreement, engaging engineers and having preliminary design meetings with the town by February 2020; Have an approved design ready for permitting by March 2020; obtaining CRMC, DEM and building permits by June 2020, Construction from June to November 2020; and occupancy by December 2020.

 

 

 

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