Letter: Children should know where meat comes from

Posted 3/23/20

To the editor:

In the March 18 editorial, Dennis Tabella brings to light an interesting moral and philosophical question — whether children should take part in the killing of animals through …

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Letter: Children should know where meat comes from

Posted

To the editor:

In the March 18 editorial, Dennis Tabella brings to light an interesting moral and philosophical question — whether children should take part in the killing of animals through RI DEM’s (Department of Environmental Management) promoting of a Youth Wild Turkey Hunt for children ages 12 to 15. 

Though I respect Mr. Tabella’s point of view, I disagree with it in some regard. 

I believe that children should not be protected from our processes of food production. Understanding the origin of our food sources allows us all to be active participants in determining the choices we make. This applies to households consuming animal products as well as those that do not. 

Overcoming the disconnect between food production and food consumption is important in reestablishing something I feel has been diminished — our respect for and understanding of food. We all need to understand where our food comes — including our children. The Barrington Farm School does this with agriculture. The same efforts should take place for animal products. 

I won’t comment on whether children should be part of the ending of an animal’s life — I’ll leave that one to individual families to consider. I do believe, however, children should be knowledgeable and even part of the process of meat production. This is where my views differ with Mr. Tabella. Mr. Tabella believes that a desensitization to the destruction of life will occur. I believe just the opposite. I believe this engagement in the food production process — the hunting and processing of animals for food — would create more respect for living creatures. 

Meat should not be viewed as something that appears on the shelves of our grocery stores. There is value in understanding where that meat comes from and that animals did in fact die in the process of creating many of the foods some of us choose to consume.

On Mr. Tabella’s question of whether “we take our children to a slaughterhouse,” if we currently don’t, maybe we should. It might be a good idea for everyone to visit and tour a meat production facility. It might be beneficial for all of to see where some of our food really comes from.

Kelvin Misiurski

Barrington

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A lifelong Portsmouth resident, Jim graduated from Portsmouth High School in 1982 and earned a journalism degree from the University of Rhode Island in 1986. He's worked two different stints at East Bay Newspapers, for a total of 18 years with the company so far. When not running all over town bringing you the news from Portsmouth, Jim listens to lots and lots and lots of music, watches obscure silent films from the '20s and usually has three books going at once. He also loves to cook crazy New Orleans dishes for his wife of 25 years, Michelle, and their two sons, Jake and Max.