Fall brings apples, and apples mean pie

Dot the top of the filling with bits of unsalted butter before covering it with the top crust. Dot the top of the filling with bits of unsalted butter before covering it with the top crust.

Dot the top of the filling with bits of unsalted butter before covering it with the top crust.

Dot the top of the filling with bits of unsalted butter before covering it with the top crust.

I make one or two apple pies each fall to herald the arrival of the autumn leaves, nippy temperatures and crisp apples lining the shelves at the grocery store or farmers’ market.

I’ve been tweaking this recipe for years, trying different types of apples and amounts of sugar. The Fuji has become my apple of choice in the last year or two. They are crisp right through the winter, are sweet to eat, and bake up nicely in all types of sweet and savory dishes.

This pie is finally just right. Juicy, but not so juicy that the crust gets soggy; not too sweet, and with a nice texture to the apples.

Apple Pie

Makes a 9- to 10-inch pie

• 7 large Fuji apples, peeled and sliced

• 1 large Macintosh apple, peeled and sliced (keep separate)

• 1/2 cup sugar

• 1 tablespoon flour

• 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

• 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

• 1/4 teaspoon salt

• 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

• Pastry for a two-crust pie

• Milk and raw sugar

Place the Fuji apple slices on a rack set in a jelly roll pan and bake for 20 minutes in a 375°F. oven. Set aside to cool. Raise oven temperature to 425°F.

Mix sugar, flour, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt in a large bowl. Add the Fuji and Macintosh slices and toss until evenly coated.

Heap into a pastry-lined pie plate. Dot with bits of the butter. Cover with top crust and crimp the edges. Cut vents for steam to escape. Brush the top with milk and sprinkle with raw sugar.

The pie sometimes drips a little; so, place a sheet of foil on the rack below the rack for the pie. Bake pie for 10 minutes. Lower heat to 350° and bake another 45 minutes. Cool on a rack before cutting.

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