Little Compton — A 'Best Small Town,' magazine says

Posted

Little Compton, a "quintessential New England town," has made Executive Travel magazine's list of 'America's Best Small Towns.' The article, appearing in the September issue, selects a dozen small places. The Little Compton piece is accompanied by a photo of the Historical Society's Wilbor House.

About Little Compton, the authors write, "Looking for the quintessential New England town? You can't get much closer than Little Compton, Rhode Island. Just a swim away from neighboring Massachusetts, the tiny village was settled back in the 17th century by folks from Plymouth Colony who wanted to expand their land holdings. History and architecture buffs won't want to miss the Wilbor House, built in 1692 and now home to the Little Compton Historical Society.

"Be sure to explore the town commons too, one of only three in the state, the whole of which is on the National Register of Historic Places. Lloyd's Beach, where locals (and visitors in the know) go to swim, is just down the road. The entrance can be formidable, but battle valiantly past the rocks and a lovely swath of sand awaits your towel. End the day with a sea-to-table dinner at the Sakonnet Point Marina. Locally caught lobster and oysters pair perfectly with glasses of award-winning Gewürztraminer from Carolyn's Sakonnet Vineyards. Better yet, stop by the winery for a tasting and a tour of the vine-covered grounds."

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment

2016 by East Bay Newspapers

Barrington · Bristol · East Providence · Little Compton · Portsmouth · Prudence Island · Riverside · Rumford · Seekonk · Tiverton · Warren · Westport
Meet our staff
Jim McGaw

A lifelong Portsmouth resident, Jim graduated from Portsmouth High School in 1982 and earned a journalism degree from the University of Rhode Island in 1986. He's worked two different stints at East Bay Newspapers, for a total of 18 years with the company so far. When not running all over town bringing you the news from Portsmouth, Jim listens to lots and lots and lots of music, watches obscure silent films from the '20s and usually has three books going at once. He also loves to cook crazy New Orleans dishes for his wife of 25 years, Michelle, and their two sons, Jake and Max.