Coyotes do indeed seem to be growing more bold

A coyote carries a Canada goose across a field above Sisson Pond in Portsmouth. (Photo by Orin Lowe.) A coyote carries a Canada goose across a field above Sisson Pond in Portsmouth. (Photo by Orin Lowe.)
A coyote carries a Canada goose across a field above Sisson Pond in Portsmouth. (Photo by Orin Lowe.)

A coyote carries a Canada goose across a field above Sisson Pond in Portsmouth. (Photo by Orin Lowe.)

To the editor:
In response to your January 10 coyote piece, I’m sending a picture of a coyote near 412 Jepson Lane, Portsmouth, in the Quonset View Farm field above Sisson Pond in 2011.  This may be Jepsie with a goose in his mouth. 
Later we spotted another — or the same — coming up from Sisson, boldly crossing the back yard by the garage and crossing Jepson to an unknown destination headed west. I got a picture of him before he disappeared around the garage but have misplaced it. 
It takes a rugged critter to carry a heavy goose all the way up from the pond that you can see in the background. 
My daughter lives on Armando Drive next to St. Philomena’s and has had a whole pack of young coyotes in her yard. The fact that they have lost the fear of people is not a good thing.  I would worry about small children playing unattended where these animals are packing up.  Every time I have seen a lost cat sign, I have remarked to my wife that it probably fell victim to predators. 
Growing up in rural Maine I have no problem with these animals in the wild, but packing up in developed areas and losing the fear of people is, as the article points out, a precursor for ending badly. Look at the conservation agency track maps mentioned in the article and you get an idea of the rather intense activity on the island and where the “hot” spots are.  I now live on Seneca Rd. and we seem to be in a “cooler” zone.  Hope this is of interest to someone.
Respectfully,
Orin Lowe
Portsmouth

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