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East Providence athletes, coaches make the best of what they have

By   /   June 16, 2013  /   Be the first to comment

Regrettably, we here at The Post have forsaken much of our Sports coverage, specifically that of East Providence High School athletics, over the last year. The move had much to do with the nature of the newspaper business, the continued financial strain on the industry, which remains in a state of flux as it attempts to find a proper balance between the influence of the internet, with its potential of ample revenue streams, and the still profitable, but ever shrinking print portion of its portfolio.

The time of reporters, editors and photographers as well as space in the actual newspaper are of limited supply. But as the 2012-13 school year comes to a close, it is important to recognize the role sports plays in the high school experience of students and it also necessary to note the successes of those deserving EPHS teams and coaches this term.

Most recently, the Townies won the boys’ state outdoor track and field championship. Under the tutelage of head coach Bob Lyons, East Providence defeated perennial power Bishop Hendricken in a storybook finish. The title was just the fifth all-time for the locals, who competed in the sport for at least eight decades, and first since 1997. And it showed E.P. remains relevant against private schools as well as more affluent public school towns.

The resurgent Townies also had a terrific baseball season this spring and if not for some key injuries their softball counterparts might still be playing for a state title. As of this writing, the EPHS boys’ volleyball team was, in fact, still vying for a state championship, head coach Keith Martinous having once again rebuilt the Townies into a competitive force.

The players and coaches in East Providence, far too many in number to name, deserve considerable credit for their efforts in all three seasons — fall, winter and spring. They do so always, though likely never more than they do currently.

Financial constraints have made being an athlete and a coach at EPHS as difficult as ever. What they lack in monetary and administrative support, is made up for through shear will and determination.

There is a lesson in there somewhere for the rest of the city to take. Make the best of what you have and good things can still happen.

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