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Four west coast wines and a luxurious Spanish Priorat at a very drinkable price point

By   /   May 30, 2013  /   Be the first to comment

Food—Wine—RavennaRavenna Riesling Columbia Valley, Washington 2009
Many believe Riesling is “too sweet” for them, but perhaps they have just  not tasted a true Riesling. Ravenna may not be a German Riesling, but it drinks just as well and has notes reminiscent of some of the best. In my opinion, Riesling is among the most complex white wines in the world. With age, Riesling will show notes like no other wine. This dry Riesling shows notes of honeysuckle, pear, apple, and slate-minerality. For anyone who thinks Riesling is too sweet, this is the one that will change their perception—for the better. $14.99
Pair with bacon wrapped seared scallops.

Food—Wine—SilverBR Cohn Silver Label North Coast, California 2011
Bruce Cohn is not only one of the best winemakers in California; he is also the Black Water Legend who managed the Doobie Brothers through their success. Opened in 1984 with Helen Turley (don’t know her? Look her up, she’s awesome) as their inaugural winemaker, BR Cohn has produced quality wine since day one. The Silver Label Chardonnay exhibits a dry, full and rich mouth feel with flavors of pineapple, pears, and creamy vanilla to wash it all down. $15.99
Pair with a picnic and double cream brie with honey.

Food—Wine—ForisForis Rogue Valley, OR Pinot Noir 2010
Oregon is best known for their Willamette Valley Pinot Noirs, so why doesn’t the Rogue Valley get any love? The Rogue Valley is the southernmost wine growing region in Oregon, while the Willamette is close to the most northerly. Who cares, right? Wrong! Rogue Valley Pinots offer a fuller, richer mouth feel than those of the Willamette Valley. For those of you looking for a luscious, almost fuzzy mouth feel with flavors of cherry and blueberry, this is your Pinot Noir. $19.99
Pair with grilled swordfish with a lemon caper butter sauce.

Food—Wine—ConveySenorio Convey Priorat, Spain 2009
What the heck is Priorat? Priorat is one of the most luxurious of Spanish reds. It is also one of two wine regions in Spain that holds the highest level of wine standards (D.O.Ca) by the Spanish Wine Governance. The other is the well-known Rioja region. The Catalan-named, Llicorella soils of Priorat, are red & black slate mixed with Mica. This soil reflects sunlight all day onto the grapes. It also absorbs heat to emit it all night, making for  very ripe grapes. This wine is composed of 50% Grenache, 30% Carignan, and 20% Syrah, and is bold with an almost chalky texture from the Llicorella soil as well as dried fruit characteristics from the heat of the region. Priorat typically yields very hefty price tags, making Senorio Convey a phenomenal value. $15
Pair with herb-crusted lamb chops.

Peter Andrews CSS, CSW, MBA, is the General Manager of Grapes & Grains fine wine, craft beer, and small-batch spirits shop in Barrington. Any questions or comments on the Monthly Wine Review? Give Peter a call at G&G- (401) 245-2100.

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