Landmark cancer study seeks participants here

South Coast hospitals want to recruit area residents to take part in a historic cancer research project that coincides with the 100th birthday of the American Cancer Society.

Cancer Prevention Study-3 (CPS-3) will give scientists a better understanding of cancer causes and prevention. The society is looking for local men and women between the ages of 30 and 65 from various racial/ethnic backgrounds with no personal history of cancer to help reach full enrollment of at least 300,000 people.

Local residents will have many opportunities to enroll in CPS-3:

  • Tuesday, June 4, 2 – 6:30 p.m., Charlton Memorial Hospital, 363 Highland Avenue, Fall River
  • Wednesday, June 5, Noon – 4:30 p.m., St. Luke’s Hospital, 101 Page Street, New Bedford
  • Wednesday, June 5, 3– 6:30 p.m., Fort Taber Park Community Center, 1000 South Rodney French Boulevard, New Bedford
  • Thursday, June 6, Noon – 4:30 p.m., Tobey Hospital, 43 High Street, Wareham

There will also be a CPS-3 enrollment at the American Cancer Society Relay For Life of Greater Fall River, Friday, June 21, 5-9 p.m. at Bishop Connolly High School in Fall River.  No appointment is necessary to enroll at the relay.

“In addition to changing our own health habits, many of us can help cancer research by taking the time to participate in this study and, thus, adding to the extensive body of knowledge that helps all of us better understand this devastating disease. It is a simple, but very valuable contribution that you can make to this cause, said Elizabeth Blanchard, MD, medical oncologist and director of the Clinical Trials Program for Southcoast Centers for Cancer Care.

Signing up requires a one-time visit to read and sign a consent form, complete a survey, have your waist measured, and give a small non-fasting blood sample. Participants will also complete a more detailed survey at home and will continue to receive periodic follow-up surveys.

Researchers will use data from CPS-3 to build on evidence from those earlier cancer prevention studies, which began in the 1950s and involved hundreds of thousands of volunteer participants.

“Many individuals diagnosed with cancer struggle to answer the question, ‘What caused my cancer?’ In many cases, we don’t know the answer,” said Alpa V. Patel, Ph.D., principal investigator of CPS-3. “CPS-3 will help us better understand what factors cause cancer, and once we know that, we can be better equipped to prevent cancer.”

For more information about CPS-3, or to schedule an enrollment appointment, visi tcancer.org/cps3NE or call toll-free 1-888-604-5888.

 

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