East Providence High pool fixes will still cost a pretty penny

ephs pool

EAST PROVIDENCE — After a review by outside experts, it was determined the issues with the soon-to-be closed East Providence High School pool can be remedied, but it will still take a significant financial commitment.

At a special School Committee session held Friday night, June 28, Marshall Muir of Muir Aquatics LLC presented the board with the initial results of a review he, contractors and engineers conducted on the facility Wednesday, June 26.

Mr. Muir, whose company does business as Envious Swimming and operates the aquatics facility at Cumberland High School among other swim related ventures, estimated it would cost closer to $1 million to sort out all the problems with the EPHS pool. That number, while hefty, is still much less than the near $4 million the Committee heard it could possibly take to fix the pool when it recently voted to close the facility.

According to his estimates, Mr. Muir said it would cost in the neighborhood of $40,000 to lay a PVC membrane liner inside the pool, which would stops leaks.

To fix the deck area surrounding the pool, it would cost in the range of $50,000 to $80,000. Mr. Muir said years of corrosion by chlorinated water has caused significant damage to the drains and the steel structure around them.

Upwards of $280,000 possibly could be needed in concrete and steel repairs to the building itself.

Another $200,000 would likely be needed to make the facility compliant with Americans with Disabilities Act mandates. That would require installing handicap access to locker rooms, rest rooms and to the pool itself.

In addition, Mr. Muir suggested it would appropriate to repair the ceiling of the pool, which needs asbestos remediation, and that the viewing stands need to be brought up to safety specifications. To do those things, approximately another $200,000 would be added to the tab.

Though remaining upbeat about the prospects, Mr. Muir told the Committee he and his experts in the field need to study the structural integrity of the entire building to see if the project is worthwhile.

“We need to take another view, but we would love to dive into it,” Mr. Muir concluded. “But we need to find out about the structure of the building itself before we can think about moving forward.”

There was little discussion among the Committee members following the presentation. Mr. Muir will return before the Committee at a later date for further review. At this point, however, the EPHS pool, per the previous Committee vote, will be closed in short order upon completion of the 2012-13 term, which ended on June 27.

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