Coyote management talk Wednesday in Portsmouth

Jepsy, a large member of the south Portsmouth coyote pack, poses for the camera early last year. Scientists warned residents to remove food sources and keep pets in after coyotes had become unusually bold and abundant in that part of town. The town later approved a no-feed ordinance. Jepsy, a large member of the south Portsmouth coyote pack, poses for the camera early last year. Scientists warned residents to remove food sources and keep pets in after coyotes had become unusually bold and abundant in that part of town. The town later approved a no-feed ordinance.

Jepsy, a large member of the south Portsmouth coyote pack, poses for the camera early last year. Scientists warned residents to remove food sources and keep pets in after coyotes had become unusually bold and abundant in that part of town. The town later approved a no-feed ordinance.

Jepsy, a large member of the south Portsmouth coyote pack, poses for the camera early last year. Scientists warned residents to remove food sources and keep pets in after coyotes had become unusually bold and abundant in that part of town. The town later approved a no-feed ordinance.

PORTSMOUTH — Dr. Numi Mitchell, lead scientist of the Narragansett Bay Coyote Study, will speak on coyote management in Common Fence Point and surrounding areas next week.

“There have been numerous sightings of coyotes in the (Common Fence Point) area and information would be helpful to teach how to co-exist safely,” said Karen Gleason, a neighbor in the area.

Local residents are encouraged to attend the free informational lecture and bring their questions, experiences and concerns regarding coyotes in the area.

The event is open to all and will be held at the Common Fence Point Improvement Association Community Hall, 933 Anthony Road, at 7:15 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 15.

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