Barrington residents urged to turn in old meds, no questions asked

BAY Team official Kathy Sullivan (center) responded the recent compliance checks: "This is very concerning to our coalition." BAY Team official Kathy Sullivan (center) responded the recent compliance checks: "This is very concerning to our coalition."

BAY Team official Kathy Sullivan (center) has helped organize a drug take-back event for April 27: "We appreciate the time and effort that community members take to rid their homes of potentially dangerous medications."

BAY Team official Kathy Sullivan (center) has helped organize a drug take-back event for April 27: “We appreciate the time and effort that community members take to rid their homes of potentially dangerous medications.”

The Barrington Police Department will coordinate with the BAY Team and the federal Drug Enforcement Administration to host a drug take-back event on Saturday, April 27 here in Barrington.

The initiative seeks to prevent increased medication abuse and theft, removing potentially expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs that will later be destroyed.

According to a press release from the local police department and BAY Team, people can stop into the Barrington Police Station on Federal Road from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on April 27 and drop the medication into a collection box. The service is free and anonymous and no questions will be asked of individuals dropping off the drugs.

“Our local drug take-back events have been very successful,” said Kathy Sullivan, program director for the BAY Team. “We appreciate the time and effort that community members take to rid their homes of potentially dangerous medications.

“I am grateful for the BAY Team’s Prescription Drug Committee members who are committed to preventing addiction caused by prescription drug abuse. This event is just one way we, as a community, can help reduce youth access to potentially dangerous or addictive medication.”

In Sept. 2012, Americans reportedly dropped 244 tons of prescription drugs into collection boxes at more than 5,200 sites. In a five-year period, the Drug Enforcement Administration and its partners has collected more than 1,000 tons of pills.

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