100 Years Ago in Warren: Bristol baseball beatdown

Jack Simister, one of the all time great pitchers to come out of Warren, is a member of the Warren Athletic Hall of Fame. Jack Simister, one of the all time great pitchers to come out of Warren, is a member of the Warren Athletic Hall of Fame.

Jack Simister, one of the all time great pitchers to come out of Warren, is a member of the Warren Athletic Hall of Fame.

Taken from the pages of the Warren and Barrington Gazette this week in October 1912:

Bristol gamesmanship fails

Warren dealt a crushing defeat to Bristol last Saturday in the game on Franklin field when big Jack Simister showed his superb pitching to the Bristol players and the big crowd of spectators.

With sixteen strikeouts and only five hits, two of which were scratch hits, Simister made a record that will be hard to beat. It was an ideal day and the crowd of nearly 5000 baseball enthusiasts were treated to a very exciting although a little one sided exhibition of the national game.

The contest was marred by several uncalled for squabbles between umpire and players. To show the true sportsmanlike manner which the Bristolites have maintained throughout the series this fall the crowd was treated to a school boy argument rather than that of a manager of a baseball team of some note. “Georgie” Guinan has the eye of an eagle and he really thought that the pitchers box had been moved toward home plate by several feet. He may have thought Simister would weaken before the game was over – but no, hardly that. Well, “Georgie” asked Umpire McVey to measure it and he in turn requested “Georgie” to produce a measuring tape. There seemed to be no one in the large crowd of 5000 who had the necessary article so Umpire McVey started the game.

But “Georgie” still had his doubts and after a couple of balls had been pitched he produced a tape and stopped the game. It was one of those vest pocket affairs measuring about a yard. Umpire McVey thought time was only being wasted and was about to start the game once more without taking the trouble to measure the distance. “Georgie” in a trembling voice and with a bucket full of tears already to drop anytime, said, “You will have to measure that distance or there will be no game.”

Umpire McVey called Umpire Wetherell in from the field and the measuring started. It was measured from home plate to the pitchers’ box to the home plate. The first measurement showed the distance five inches nearer than it should have been and the second time showed a distance of nine inches short.  (The Phoenix says 2 feet, but of course that is printed in Bristol.)

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