Author Archives: Kristin Green

Cobalt blue sea holly mellows the garden's color clash and feeds the pollinators.

It’s a (not quite) blue enough summer

It’s a (not quite) blue enough summer

As soon as summer’s heat hits, I spend more time critiquing my garden than tending it. If only I were better about making notes, I might have remembered that every year right around now, I become bothered by what’s missing, particularly from the backyard border I can see from my desk. College level color theory

Early summer brings garden invaders

I’m pretty sure it was Christopher Lloyd of Great Dixter who, in one of his many books or articles, dared us to keep our gardens blooming into summer and fall. “Spring is easy,” I think he said. I agree! Or thought I did. On the one hand, of all the seasons, the one we’re in

The cause of my Black Lace elderberry's demise — an elderberry shoot borer.

Down to Earth

Looking around my May garden I’m reminded of the scene from Monty Python and the Holy Grail in which Eric Idle walks through a plague-infested village collecting a cartful of corpses. “Bring out your dead!” he shouts. I wouldn’t blame you for questioning my sanity and attitude but let me assure you that I’m not

Go vagabonding in your own Mayscape

One of my favorite garden writers, the late great Janet Gillespie, Westport author and columnist for the New Bedford Standard Times, said of May, “in the garden seeds are coming up, weeds are proliferating, new plants arrive to be tended to and there are a hundred jobs to do. Don’t do them. Like Mole in

Time to get a move on

One recent sunny Saturday I awoke to a garden that suddenly looked less like a debris field and more like a place where green things might grow. Perennials are poking out from beneath the mulch made of winter’s stems and twigs. My tulips are up and opening, and the honesty (Lunaria annua) has budded early,

Don’t abandon indoor plants

It’s not often that I imagine my plants quoting dead poets. Or living ones for that matter. But I can almost hear my indoor collection sigh, “April is the cruellest month.” Suddenly, right when they need me the most, I have abandoned them and gone outside to garden. It’s not as if I can help

Pussy willows like this Salix chaenomeloides 'Mt. Aso' can be cut all the way to the ground after flowering to keep them from getting leggy.

A method to the madness of Spring

Spring is finally working its way in (never mind last week’s snow). It has to be. The calendar says so. The redwing blackbirds have been back for weeks. The ***** willows are out and the maples have begun to look lightly dusted in fall colors. (It’s almost as if they’re reminding us not to get

When spring drags its feet…force it

Forget what I said about savoring the last weeks of winter. I’m over it now and I know you are too. Spring can’t come fast enough. Sunshiny days in the 50s and 60s are just a wicked tease arriving as they still do between snow showers and polar vortices. We’re all ready for the tug

Invasive is a four-letter word

There are two things that can disturb my equanimity in the garden (besides the woodchuck): invasive species growing with wild abandon, and hearing any of my favorite plants described as invasive. I know I’m not alone with the former vexation. But I don’t know too many people who get as hot under the collar as

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